C3 Test for Coronavirus - Will you Support it?

I’ve just stumbled across this and I thought for you guys in the States, its’ most useful, but I imagine it’ll be helpful for all.

Great idea being shown here. I think this could be a winner…

We all hope that our governments can contain this by themselves, but with great initiatives like this, every little helps in my opinion :slight_smile:

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I think that we need to rethink a lot of how we do things in the future so tests like this and also another test I read about this morning, telling if you have had the virus or not and could return to work

Those would be great for return to work employees to reduce the spread. If you pass you can work.

If that is the requirement, I should go infect myself now if possible and then be able to move on. I am very low risk, so is my whole family here, just get it out of the way. Antibody testing is good to find out who is really safe from this, but staying shut down is just not an option much longer whether you have had it or not.

What we need, and there is some good progress on this, is effective treatments to shorten the symptoms and make them less severe in those who do have bad symptoms, so that we can let it go through the population like a normal flu without having excess deaths to hospital overcrowding. The combo of Hydroxychloroquine and an antibiotic seems to be very effective at this in limited studies, but in both New York and France.


They do talk about it being “anecdotal” at this point - but it doesn’t have to be perfectly validated in everyone if a well known drug with limited side effects that is cheap to make appears to make a difference, that can really help.

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Its important to note it probably depends on which strain you get. There are 2 atm that are fairly unique.

I don’t think that is quite correct. This is not a fast mutating virus, more of a slow one, which is why there is a good chance at an effective vaccine. Some details here:

We don’t have a great explanation for the wild differences in intensity and outcome, although I have heard a lot of different ones, from different transmission (airborne vs fecal-oral) to intensity of exposure and a whole hose in between. But I haven’t seen information pointing to multiple strains.

Might be wrong just going off of this, guess there are more than 2 now. Supposedly every 2 weeks this thing adjusts. Its why a vaccine is so hard atm.

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They are using the word strains in an interesting way there. Genetically there are some minor variations, but they don’t cause different symptoms, and they won’t cause problems with creating a vaccine.

Quoting the article you posted:

But Nextstrain co-founder Trevor Bedford said the mutations are so small that there is no strain of the virus that is more harmful.
“These mutations are completely benign and useful as a puzzle piece to uncover how the virus is spreading,” Bedford told the outlet.

The article I put up describes the way flu changes, which can involve quite dramatic differences, and explains why a flu vaccine is so much harder to do than something like this. This should be closer to measles or diptheria in that a vaccine once developed should have long term stability and effectiveness.